Monday, October 16, 2006

Re: WELCOME BACK ONION - FRIDAY OCTOBER 20

Okay everybody the party is going to be at my house, after dinner on Friday night (8:30 or later) . . .  come on by and say hi to Onion and hear some of his Tall Tales from the Road.
 
1116 barkdull st (2 blocks west of montrose, 3 blocks north of bissonnet)
 
also, please invite any other friends of Onion who aren't on this list . . .
 
JR

 
On 10/4/06, Jeremy Radcliffe <jradbo@gmail.com> wrote:
Hold the date people, we are going to get together and welcome onion back to town and view pictures and hear stories and drink beer and soda and just have a lot of fun on FRIDAY OCTOBER 20 in the evening (after dinner, say). It will either be at my house (1116 barkdull st) or my mother's house (1213 berthea), to be determined. It doesn't really matter for your purposes since they're about 3 blocks away from one another. The important thing to do is to note on your calendar that after dinner on Friday night you should plan on hanging out with Onion.
 
(a few) details to follow . . .
 
JR

 
On 9/24/06, Onion < dannythefish@gmail.com> wrote:

I rode into St. George, UT on Monday morning and was traveling via automobile by 12:30.  With four stops for gas and a four hour nap in a roadside rest stop, I made the 1400 mile journey in about 28 hours.  The speed limit on interstates in Arizona and New Mexico is 75 mph.  I traveled for about eight hours down I-40 from Flagstaff to Amarillo with my cruise control set at what I considered to be a conservative 80 mph, because I'm cautious like that, and was not passed by one single vehicle the entire time.  I think that's kind of weird.  On the radio, I heard Golden Earring's entire catalogue twice.  That is, I heard 'Radar Love' two times and 'Twilight Zone' two times.  I heard 'Born To Be Wild' about a dozen times, and as I got into Texas I started to hear a ZZ Top or Stevie Ray Vaughn song about every thirty minutes while flipping across the dial.  I've missed ZZ Top on the radio.  I was so glad to be home, it brought joy to my heart to see Dallas rising on the horizon.  An hour later I was even happier to leave Dallas in the rearview mirror, as I always have been.

So, I'm back.  If you would like to speak with me, I can be reached at 832-866-2017.  Feel free to call 24/7...I'm unemployed.

Here are some numbers and some lists...

8,271 Miles - Final Odometer Reading (This total includes days off when I rode seventy miles, ten mile round
                trips from camp to the nearest store and back, and wrong turns that added thirty miles to my
                day. It does not include a couple of days when my odometer ran out of batteries, or was not
                working due to a frayed wire, miles that I rode through construction in the back of a truck, or the
                distance between where Jamie met me and where she dropped me off when she came to visit.)
18 - States Visited
3 - Canadian Provinces Visited
178 - Days on the Road
9,666 Feet - Highest Elevation (Powder River Pass, Bighorn Mountains, WY)
66 - Showers (Including Lakes, Streams, and Rivers)
133 Miles - Longest Daily Distance (Selkirk PP, Ontario to Pinery PP, Ontario, 5/3/2006)
476 Ounces - Peanut Butter Consumed (By Weight)(Add three kilograms.  I don't know how many ounces
                that is, but it's a lot.)
14.75 Miles - Longest Coast "No Pedaling" (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
43 MPH - Top Speed (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
4 - Times Across The Continental Divide
5 - Time Zone Changes
12 - Tunnels
1 Mile - Longest Tunnel
500 Yards - Longest Tunnel I Didn't Hitch A Ride Through
0 - Encounters With Jerks
 
Things Broke or Wore Out...
 
12 - Flats(Including one double flat in Salt Lake City, UT)
1 - Front Derailleur(I left home with an antique derailleur on my bike. Good one.)
1 - Tent Pole(Long)(Snapped about a week out)
1 - Batting Gloves
3 - Rear Spoke
1 - Rear Rim
1 - Chain
3 - Rear Tire
1 - Bike Shorts
1 - Cycling Socks
1 - Lighter(Bic)
1 - Derailleur Cable(Rear)
1 - Ballpoint Pen
4,600 Miles - Rear Hub Serviced(Jackson, WY)
 
I intended to make a list of strange things that I saw on the side of the road, but much to my shame and surprise, I did not see many strange things, or much trash of any kind on the side of the road once I left The South.  Booo!
 
I will have the reading list out sometime in the next week.
 
Peace!

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.8/455 - Release Date: 9/22/2006




--
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin Franklin, 1759.



--
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin Franklin, 1759.

Wednesday, October 04, 2006

RE: WELCOME BACK ONION - DFW RECEPTION

Tall boys?


From: Seth M. Anderson [mailto:Seth@StephensAnderson.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 2:40 PM
To: jradbo@gmail.com; 'Onion'
Cc: 'Wes Davis'; 'Adam Thomas'; 'Amy(Biker)'; 'Ann Readcliffe'; 'Ben Hart'; 'Ben Hurst'; 'Blog'; 'Brian Thorp'; Britain@comic.com; 'Bryan Galligan'; 'Carey Ford'; 'Chad Shimaitis'; 'Charles Hurst'; 'Chipman Earle'; 'Chris Hogan'; 'Chris Watham'; 'Da Kid'; 'Devin Cox'; 'Dominic B. Mandola'; 'Dublin'; 'Eliot Edmunds'; 'Gary Bergstrand'; Hrncir, Gustav/DEN; 'Hilary Glassman'; 'Jake Radcliffe'; 'James Sivco'; 'Jamie Farr'; 'Jamie Knight'; 'JASON ADAME'; 'Jeff Leva'; 'Jim Curl'; 'Jody Rupp'; 'John Hempfling'; 'Jonathon Jackson'; 'Karen Looney'; 'Kevin Reagin'; 'Kris Looney'; 'Lawyer's Filing & Delivery'; 'Linda Farr'; 'Mandy(Biker)'; 'Matt Crowley'; 'Matt Mallay'; 'Matthew Newtown'; 'Micah Antill'; 'Michael Meagher'; 'Miguel Grillo'; 'Patsy Huett'; 'Rob Neff'; 'Robbie Siefert'; 'Robert Gleason'; 'Rory Walker'; 'Ryan Ford'; 'Ryan Hoag'; 'Ryan Shultz'; 'Scott Thrash'; 'Steve Jones'; 'Steve Jones'; 'Trey Looney'; 'John Rittman'
Subject: RE: WELCOME BACK ONION - DFW RECEPTION

If Onion will agree to pedal his ass up to the DFW area, Ryan Shultz and I will host a reception (Keystone Light on a wooden deck) up here.

 

 

Seth M. Anderson

Stephens & Anderson, L.L.P.

4200 West Vickery Blvd.

Fort Worth, TX  76107

Phone: 817-920-9000

Fax:  817-920-9016

Seth@StephensAnderson.com

www.StephensAnderson.com


From: Jeremy Radcliffe [mailto:jradbo@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 3:29 PM
To: Onion
Cc: Wes Davis; Adam Thomas; Amy(Biker); Ann Readcliffe; Ben Hart; Ben Hurst; Blog; Brian Thorp; Britain@comic.com; Bryan Galligan; Carey Ford; Chad Shimaitis; Charles Hurst; Chipman Earle; Chris Hogan; Chris Watham; Da Kid; Devin Cox; Dominic B. Mandola; Dublin; Eliot Edmunds; Gary Bergstrand; Gus Hrincir; Hilary Glassman; Jake Radcliffe; James Sivco; Jamie Farr; Jamie Knight; JASON ADAME; Jeff Leva; Jim Curl; Jody Rupp; John Hempfling; Jonathon Jackson; Karen Looney; Kevin Reagin; Kris Looney; Lawyer's Filing & Delivery; Linda Farr; Mandy(Biker); Matt Crowley; Matt Mallay; Matthew Newtown; Micah Antill; Michael Meagher; Miguel Grillo; Patsy Huett; Rob Neff; Robbie Siefert; Robert Gleason; Rory Walker; Ryan Ford; Ryan Hoag; Ryan Shultz; Scott Thrash; Seth Anderson; Steve Jones; Steve Jones; Trey Looney; John Rittman
Subject: WELCOME BACK ONION - FRIDAY OCTOBER 20

 

Hold the date people, we are going to get together and welcome onion back to town and view pictures and hear stories and drink beer and soda and just have a lot of fun on FRIDAY OCTOBER 20 in the evening (after dinner, say). It will either be at my house (1116 barkdull st) or my mother's house (1213 berthea), to be determined. It doesn't really matter for your purposes since they're about 3 blocks away from one another. The important thing to do is to note on your calendar that after dinner on Friday night you should plan on hanging out with Onion.

 

(a few) details to follow . . .

 

JR

 

On 9/24/06, Onion <dannythefish@gmail.com> wrote:

I rode into St. George, UT on Monday morning and was traveling via automobile by 12:30.  With four stops for gas and a four hour nap in a roadside rest stop, I made the 1400 mile journey in about 28 hours.  The speed limit on interstates in Arizona and New Mexico is 75 mph.  I traveled for about eight hours down I-40 from Flagstaff to Amarillo with my cruise control set at what I considered to be a conservative 80 mph, because I'm cautious like that, and was not passed by one single vehicle the entire time.  I think that's kind of weird.  On the radio, I heard Golden Earring's entire catalogue twice.  That is, I heard 'Radar Love' two times and 'Twilight Zone' two times.  I heard 'Born To Be Wild' about a dozen times, and as I got into Texas I started to hear a ZZ Top or Stevie Ray Vaughn song about every thirty minutes while flipping across the dial.  I've missed ZZ Top on the radio.  I was so glad to be home, it brought joy to my heart to see Dallas rising on the horizon.  An hour later I was even happier to leave Dallas in the rearview mirror, as I always have been.

So, I'm back.  If you would like to speak with me, I can be reached at 832-866-2017.  Feel free to call 24/7...I'm unemployed.

Here are some numbers and some lists...

8,271 Miles - Final Odometer Reading (This total includes days off when I rode seventy miles, ten mile round

                trips from camp to the nearest store and back, and wrong turns that added thirty miles to my

                day. It does not include a couple of days when my odometer ran out of batteries, or was not

                working due to a frayed wire, miles that I rode through construction in the back of a truck, or the

                distance between where Jamie met me and where she dropped me off when she came to visit.)

18 - States Visited

3 - Canadian Provinces Visited

178 - Days on the Road

9,666 Feet - Highest Elevation (Powder River Pass, Bighorn Mountains, WY)

66 - Showers (Including Lakes, Streams, and Rivers)

133 Miles - Longest Daily Distance (Selkirk PP, Ontario to Pinery PP, Ontario, 5/3/2006)

476 Ounces - Peanut Butter Consumed (By Weight)(Add three kilograms.  I don't know how many ounces

                that is, but it's a lot.)

14.75 Miles - Longest Coast "No Pedaling" (Near Gladstone PP, BC)

43 MPH - Top Speed (Near Gladstone PP, BC)

4 - Times Across The Continental Divide

5 - Time Zone Changes

12 - Tunnels

1 Mile - Longest Tunnel

500 Yards - Longest Tunnel I Didn't Hitch A Ride Through

0 - Encounters With Jerks

 

Things Broke or Wore Out...

 

12 - Flats(Including one double flat in Salt Lake City, UT)

1 - Front Derailleur(I left home with an antique derailleur on my bike. Good one.)

1 - Tent Pole(Long)(Snapped about a week out)

1 - Batting Gloves

3 - Rear Spoke

1 - Rear Rim

1 - Chain

3 - Rear Tire

1 - Bike Shorts

1 - Cycling Socks

1 - Lighter(Bic)

1 - Derailleur Cable(Rear)

1 - Ballpoint Pen

4,600 Miles - Rear Hub Serviced(Jackson, WY)

 

I intended to make a list of strange things that I saw on the side of the road, but much to my shame and surprise, I did not see many strange things, or much trash of any kind on the side of the road once I left The South.  Booo!

 

I will have the reading list out sometime in the next week.

 

Peace!

 

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.8/455 - Release Date: 9/22/2006




--
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin Franklin, 1759.

RE: WELCOME BACK ONION - DFW RECEPTION

If Onion will agree to pedal his ass up to the DFW area, Ryan Shultz and I will host a reception (Keystone Light on a wooden deck) up here.

 

 

Seth M. Anderson

Stephens & Anderson, L.L.P.

4200 West Vickery Blvd.

Fort Worth, TX  76107

Phone: 817-920-9000

Fax:  817-920-9016

Seth@StephensAnderson.com

www.StephensAnderson.com


From: Jeremy Radcliffe [mailto:jradbo@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 3:29 PM
To: Onion
Cc: Wes Davis; Adam Thomas; Amy(Biker); Ann Readcliffe; Ben Hart; Ben Hurst; Blog; Brian Thorp; Britain@comic.com; Bryan Galligan; Carey Ford; Chad Shimaitis; Charles Hurst; Chipman Earle; Chris Hogan; Chris Watham; Da Kid; Devin Cox; Dominic B. Mandola; Dublin; Eliot Edmunds; Gary Bergstrand; Gus Hrincir; Hilary Glassman; Jake Radcliffe; James Sivco; Jamie Farr; Jamie Knight; JASON ADAME; Jeff Leva; Jim Curl; Jody Rupp; John Hempfling; Jonathon Jackson; Karen Looney; Kevin Reagin; Kris Looney; Lawyer's Filing & Delivery; Linda Farr; Mandy(Biker); Matt Crowley; Matt Mallay; Matthew Newtown; Micah Antill; Michael Meagher; Miguel Grillo; Patsy Huett; Rob Neff; Robbie Siefert; Robert Gleason; Rory Walker; Ryan Ford; Ryan Hoag; Ryan Shultz; Scott Thrash; Seth Anderson; Steve Jones; Steve Jones; Trey Looney; John Rittman
Subject: WELCOME BACK ONION - FRIDAY OCTOBER 20

 

Hold the date people, we are going to get together and welcome onion back to town and view pictures and hear stories and drink beer and soda and just have a lot of fun on FRIDAY OCTOBER 20 in the evening (after dinner, say). It will either be at my house (1116 barkdull st) or my mother's house (1213 berthea), to be determined. It doesn't really matter for your purposes since they're about 3 blocks away from one another. The important thing to do is to note on your calendar that after dinner on Friday night you should plan on hanging out with Onion.

 

(a few) details to follow . . .

 

JR

 

On 9/24/06, Onion <dannythefish@gmail.com> wrote:

I rode into St. George, UT on Monday morning and was traveling via automobile by 12:30.  With four stops for gas and a four hour nap in a roadside rest stop, I made the 1400 mile journey in about 28 hours.  The speed limit on interstates in Arizona and New Mexico is 75 mph.  I traveled for about eight hours down I-40 from Flagstaff to Amarillo with my cruise control set at what I considered to be a conservative 80 mph, because I'm cautious like that, and was not passed by one single vehicle the entire time.  I think that's kind of weird.  On the radio, I heard Golden Earring's entire catalogue twice.  That is, I heard 'Radar Love' two times and 'Twilight Zone' two times.  I heard 'Born To Be Wild' about a dozen times, and as I got into Texas I started to hear a ZZ Top or Stevie Ray Vaughn song about every thirty minutes while flipping across the dial.  I've missed ZZ Top on the radio.  I was so glad to be home, it brought joy to my heart to see Dallas rising on the horizon.  An hour later I was even happier to leave Dallas in the rearview mirror, as I always have been.

So, I'm back.  If you would like to speak with me, I can be reached at 832-866-2017.  Feel free to call 24/7...I'm unemployed.

Here are some numbers and some lists...

8,271 Miles - Final Odometer Reading (This total includes days off when I rode seventy miles, ten mile round

                trips from camp to the nearest store and back, and wrong turns that added thirty miles to my

                day. It does not include a couple of days when my odometer ran out of batteries, or was not

                working due to a frayed wire, miles that I rode through construction in the back of a truck, or the

                distance between where Jamie met me and where she dropped me off when she came to visit.)

18 - States Visited

3 - Canadian Provinces Visited

178 - Days on the Road

9,666 Feet - Highest Elevation (Powder River Pass, Bighorn Mountains, WY)

66 - Showers (Including Lakes, Streams, and Rivers)

133 Miles - Longest Daily Distance (Selkirk PP, Ontario to Pinery PP, Ontario, 5/3/2006)

476 Ounces - Peanut Butter Consumed (By Weight)(Add three kilograms.  I don't know how many ounces

                that is, but it's a lot.)

14.75 Miles - Longest Coast "No Pedaling" (Near Gladstone PP, BC)

43 MPH - Top Speed (Near Gladstone PP, BC)

4 - Times Across The Continental Divide

5 - Time Zone Changes

12 - Tunnels

1 Mile - Longest Tunnel

500 Yards - Longest Tunnel I Didn't Hitch A Ride Through

0 - Encounters With Jerks

 

Things Broke or Wore Out...

 

12 - Flats(Including one double flat in Salt Lake City, UT)

1 - Front Derailleur(I left home with an antique derailleur on my bike. Good one.)

1 - Tent Pole(Long)(Snapped about a week out)

1 - Batting Gloves

3 - Rear Spoke

1 - Rear Rim

1 - Chain

3 - Rear Tire

1 - Bike Shorts

1 - Cycling Socks

1 - Lighter(Bic)

1 - Derailleur Cable(Rear)

1 - Ballpoint Pen

4,600 Miles - Rear Hub Serviced(Jackson, WY)

 

I intended to make a list of strange things that I saw on the side of the road, but much to my shame and surprise, I did not see many strange things, or much trash of any kind on the side of the road once I left The South.  Booo!

 

I will have the reading list out sometime in the next week.

 

Peace!

 

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.8/455 - Release Date: 9/22/2006




--
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin Franklin, 1759.

WELCOME BACK ONION - FRIDAY OCTOBER 20

Hold the date people, we are going to get together and welcome onion back to town and view pictures and hear stories and drink beer and soda and just have a lot of fun on FRIDAY OCTOBER 20 in the evening (after dinner, say). It will either be at my house (1116 barkdull st) or my mother's house (1213 berthea), to be determined. It doesn't really matter for your purposes since they're about 3 blocks away from one another. The important thing to do is to note on your calendar that after dinner on Friday night you should plan on hanging out with Onion.
 
(a few) details to follow . . .
 
JR

 
On 9/24/06, Onion <dannythefish@gmail.com> wrote:

I rode into St. George, UT on Monday morning and was traveling via automobile by 12:30.  With four stops for gas and a four hour nap in a roadside rest stop, I made the 1400 mile journey in about 28 hours.  The speed limit on interstates in Arizona and New Mexico is 75 mph.  I traveled for about eight hours down I-40 from Flagstaff to Amarillo with my cruise control set at what I considered to be a conservative 80 mph, because I'm cautious like that, and was not passed by one single vehicle the entire time.  I think that's kind of weird.  On the radio, I heard Golden Earring's entire catalogue twice.  That is, I heard 'Radar Love' two times and 'Twilight Zone' two times.  I heard 'Born To Be Wild' about a dozen times, and as I got into Texas I started to hear a ZZ Top or Stevie Ray Vaughn song about every thirty minutes while flipping across the dial.  I've missed ZZ Top on the radio.  I was so glad to be home, it brought joy to my heart to see Dallas rising on the horizon.  An hour later I was even happier to leave Dallas in the rearview mirror, as I always have been.

So, I'm back.  If you would like to speak with me, I can be reached at 832-866-2017.  Feel free to call 24/7...I'm unemployed.

Here are some numbers and some lists...

8,271 Miles - Final Odometer Reading (This total includes days off when I rode seventy miles, ten mile round
                trips from camp to the nearest store and back, and wrong turns that added thirty miles to my
                day. It does not include a couple of days when my odometer ran out of batteries, or was not
                working due to a frayed wire, miles that I rode through construction in the back of a truck, or the
                distance between where Jamie met me and where she dropped me off when she came to visit.)
18 - States Visited
3 - Canadian Provinces Visited
178 - Days on the Road
9,666 Feet - Highest Elevation (Powder River Pass, Bighorn Mountains, WY)
66 - Showers (Including Lakes, Streams, and Rivers)
133 Miles - Longest Daily Distance (Selkirk PP, Ontario to Pinery PP, Ontario, 5/3/2006)
476 Ounces - Peanut Butter Consumed (By Weight)(Add three kilograms.  I don't know how many ounces
                that is, but it's a lot.)
14.75 Miles - Longest Coast "No Pedaling" (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
43 MPH - Top Speed (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
4 - Times Across The Continental Divide
5 - Time Zone Changes
12 - Tunnels
1 Mile - Longest Tunnel
500 Yards - Longest Tunnel I Didn't Hitch A Ride Through
0 - Encounters With Jerks
 
Things Broke or Wore Out...
 
12 - Flats(Including one double flat in Salt Lake City, UT)
1 - Front Derailleur(I left home with an antique derailleur on my bike. Good one.)
1 - Tent Pole(Long)(Snapped about a week out)
1 - Batting Gloves
3 - Rear Spoke
1 - Rear Rim
1 - Chain
3 - Rear Tire
1 - Bike Shorts
1 - Cycling Socks
1 - Lighter(Bic)
1 - Derailleur Cable(Rear)
1 - Ballpoint Pen
4,600 Miles - Rear Hub Serviced(Jackson, WY)
 
I intended to make a list of strange things that I saw on the side of the road, but much to my shame and surprise, I did not see many strange things, or much trash of any kind on the side of the road once I left The South.  Booo!
 
I will have the reading list out sometime in the next week.
 
Peace!

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.8/455 - Release Date: 9/22/2006




--
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin Franklin, 1759.

Thursday, September 28, 2006

Greetings From H-Town - Part II

As promised, here is my reading list from the trip.  It is in approximate chronological order.  There were long periods during my absence when I did no reading.  At the beginning, it was due to the fear that a few pounds would be the difference between success and failure.  Later, it was because I passed through wide swaths of the country where people apparently don't have much respect for the written word, regardless of what the girls at the chamber of commerce say.

The Week Before I Left:
    Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance - Robert M Pirsig
        I received this book as a gift right before I left.  It was an appropriate read before I began my journey.
        On the road, I saw it in the philosophy section of a bookstore.  I'd call it literature.  I recommend it.
 
Kentucky:
    Walden and Civil Disobedience - Henry David Thoreau
        I bought this book and the following one at the Morehead State University bookstore.  Walden is
        something I have always wanted to read, and I picked the perfect time and place to do it.  Not what
        I thought, it is an ode to self-sufficiency and reflection on the beauty of nature.  Civil Disobedience is
        something that every taxpayer should read...very timely.  This was probably the book that meant the
        most to me on the trip.
 
Ohio:
    What The Buddha Taught - Walpola Rahula
        I didn't know much about Buddhism, and the selection at the college bookstore was pretty weak.  It
        seems like a pretty good one as far as religions go.
    Something Happened - Joseph Heller
        Entertaining, but Catch 22 it isn't.
 
Michigan:
    All The King's Men - Robert Penn Warren
        This book came highly recommended by people I respect.  Alas, it wasn't all I thought it would be.
        But don't take my word for it.  I've been hearing good things about it for so long that it's likely you will
        enjoy it more than I did.
 
South Dakota:
    Mostly Harmless - Douglas Adams
        I bought this book at the Walmart in Pierre, SD.  It's not exactly what I am into these days, but I
        enjoyed Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy series as a youth.  Douglas Adams is witty
        and hilarious.
    Ulysses - James Joyce
        I don't know why did this to myself.  I guess so I could say I read it.  I did have some idea what
        was going on in the second 400 pages of the book and the ending was quite powerful.  Don't try
        to read this book without an English dictionary, a Latin dictionary, and a history of Ireland close
        at hand for reference.
 
Wyoming:
    Light In August - William Faulkner
        This is the first of three Faulkner books I read on the trip.  Granted, I did not start with the easiest
        of his works, but I was reading my third of his books before I really got the gist of any of them.  Since
        then, they have been better and better.  If you are a new reader, this is a good one to start with. 
        Good story and easy to follow.
 
Montana:
    Travels With Charlie(In Search Of America) - Ernest Hemingway
        I bought this book on the recommendation of a friend.  I have never been a big Hemingway fan, but
        since someone took the time to tell me to read it, I was happy to oblige.  It is a travelogue, written
        late in the author's life.  Many of his experiences were analogous to ones of my own on the road, so
        I liked it a lot.  Give it a read.
    The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli
        Another timely one.  At only 100 pages, you can't go wrong.  It is written by a famous courtesan and
        political advisor from medieval Italy.  It has long been considered the handbook for how to acquire and
        hold a empire.  Hitler was a big fan.  Though the ends to which this how-to book leads are ignoble,
        and most certainly barbaric, it is interesting to compare its' suggestions with the actions America
        has taken in its' current imperial adventure...someone should have read Machiavelli.
 
Alberta:
    Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
        This book was written as a warning against what the author saw as a creeping totalitarianism in
        post-war England and America.  I thought it was a pretty good book.  An easy and entertaining read.
 
British Columbia:
    Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
        I stick with my original review.  The funniest book about a pedophile I have ever read.  Read this and
        you can be entertained and seem intellectual at the same time.
    His Majesty's Dragon - Naomi Kline
        This book was given to me by a fellow traveler...the only book I have ever thrown away after reading.
    Joseph Andrews - Henry Fielding
        This book is just as funny as Tom Jones, but only about one third as long.  So if you are afraid of
        commitment, but still want to be familiar with the height of 18th century English wit, this is the book
        for you.
    The Unvanquished - William Faulkner
        Read more Faulkner!
    The Diary Of A Madman And Other Stories - Nikolai Gogol
        A collection of short stories.  I think they are supposed to be funny, but they miss the mark.
    The Marble Faun - Nathaniel Hawthorne
        I somehow got through school without having to read The Scarlet Letter, which is okay because I
        know, it's an A.  Anyway, I'm glad I didn't because I think this book stinks!
    The Castle - Franz Kafka
        This book is hilarious!  It illustrates the pointlessness and frustration in man's search for knowledge.
        Unfortunately, Kafka died before finishing the book, so it kind of just stops in the middle, which sucks.
       
 
Washington:
    White Noise - Don DeLillo
        This book and the following three were given to me to read by my friend Jeremy.  This book is about
        the absurdity and frustration of modern life circa 1885.  I liked it, didn't love it.
    Death In Venice And Seven Other Stories - Thomas Mann
        I had never read Thomas Mann before.  This is good stuff!
    Fever Pitch - Nick Hornby
        This is a book about a soccer fanatic.  I have never been more than a casual fan of any sport, if that,
        but this book gave me a glimpse of what is going on in the minds of my more sports-obsessed friends.
        This book is very, very funny and can be enjoyed by sports lovers as well as those that wonder at
        them. 
    Hard-Boiled Wonderland And The End Of The World - Haruki Murakami
        I have been hearing about Haruki Murakami for a few years now from the person who lent me this
        book.  I would describe it as intelligent, literate sci-fi/fantasy.  It is set in a near future Tokyo where
        anything can happen.  Would you live in your dreams if you could?  It leaves you thinking.
    McTeague - Frank Norris
        This book is described in the foreword as a 'minor classic'.  By those standards, I could produce a
        minor classic.  I would call it pulp.
    Heart Of Darkness And The Secret Sharer - Joseph Conrad
        Can you believe I had never read this?  It lives up to its' billing.  It inspired 'Apocalypse Now' for
        goodness' sake!
    Sketches From A Hunter's Album - Ivan Turgenev
        Beautiful descriptions of pastoral Russia and wonderful accounts of the Russian feudal system in
        practice.  Turgenev was put under house arrest for this seemingly lovely and harmless book.
 
Idaho:
    Go Down, Moses - William Faulkner
        Another good one.  A collection of seven interrelated short stories, this was the most complex of
        Faulkner's books that I read on the trip.  I wrote in one of my updates that Sinclair Lewis was probably
        my favorite American author, and he was for a long time.  I have to say that William Faulkner now
        holds that title.
    Narcissus And Goldmund - Hermann Hesse
        This is another book that touched close to what I was doing at the time I read it.  It is probably the
        best Hermann Hesse book that I have read, of course it has about a one in four chance of that.  I
        recommend it.
    The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles - Haruki Murakami
        This is the second book by Murakami that I read on the trip, and the one that my friend has been
        suggesting to me for the past couple of years.  I preferred this one by a long margin.  My friend 
        preferred Hard-Boiled Wonderland, so I'd call it a pick 'em.  I would recommend reading one of them 
        because I am going to go out on a limb and guess that you haven't read much modern Japanese 
        literature.  Broaden your horizons and enjoy a good book. 
 
Utah:
    One Hundred Years Of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
        I was supposed to read this book for English class my junior year of high school.  I somehow faked
        my way through class without doing so.  If someone had told me that the book was friggin' hilarious
        I probably would have cracked it.  A friend sent this book along with the following one for me to read
        my last couple of weeks on the road.  It's a good one!
    Jitterbug Perfume - Tom Robbins
        I had never read any Tom Robbins books, and I thoroughly enjoyed this introductory experience. 
        It is modern, fun to read, and deep at the same time.  This is one of the better books I read on my
        trip.
 
I Went To The Bookstore Bookstore Last Week, And Here's What I Bought:
    The Chomsky-Foucault Debate On Human Nature - Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault
        Two dudes debate obscure linguistic points and their broad philosophical implications.  I enjoyed it,
        but I'm not going to waste any more of your time talking about it.
    Hot Water Music - Charles Bukowski
        My first experience with Bukowski.  Straight up existential smut.  Awesome!  Still reading it...
    The Portable Karl Marx - Edited by Eugene Kamenka
    Hegemony Or Survival(America's Quest For Global Dominance - Noam Chomsky
 
So, that's about it.  I hope my book reviews were neither too presumptuous, nor too vague.  I hope my updates were entertaining and informative.  I hope you all make it a priority to take some time to do something for yourself that will expand your mind, challenge your body, and give wings to your soul.  I recommend it.
 
Peace!

Sunday, September 24, 2006

Greetings From H-Town!

I rode into St. George, UT on Monday morning and was traveling via automobile by 12:30.  With four stops for gas and a four hour nap in a roadside rest stop, I made the 1400 mile journey in about 28 hours.  The speed limit on interstates in Arizona and New Mexico is 75 mph.  I traveled for about eight hours down I-40 from Flagstaff to Amarillo with my cruise control set at what I considered to be a conservative 80 mph, because I'm cautious like that, and was not passed by one single vehicle the entire time.  I think that's kind of weird.  On the radio, I heard Golden Earring's entire catalogue twice.  That is, I heard 'Radar Love' two times and 'Twilight Zone' two times.  I heard 'Born To Be Wild' about a dozen times, and as I got into Texas I started to hear a ZZ Top or Stevie Ray Vaughn song about every thirty minutes while flipping across the dial.  I've missed ZZ Top on the radio.  I was so glad to be home, it brought joy to my heart to see Dallas rising on the horizon.  An hour later I was even happier to leave Dallas in the rearview mirror, as I always have been.

So, I'm back.  If you would like to speak with me, I can be reached at 832-866-2017.  Feel free to call 24/7...I'm unemployed.

Here are some numbers and some lists...

8,271 Miles - Final Odometer Reading (This total includes days off when I rode seventy miles, ten mile round
                trips from camp to the nearest store and back, and wrong turns that added thirty miles to my
                day. It does not include a couple of days when my odometer ran out of batteries, or was not
                working due to a frayed wire, miles that I rode through construction in the back of a truck, or the
                distance between where Jamie met me and where she dropped me off when she came to visit.)
18 - States Visited
3 - Canadian Provinces Visited
178 - Days on the Road
9,666 Feet - Highest Elevation (Powder River Pass, Bighorn Mountains, WY)
66 - Showers (Including Lakes, Streams, and Rivers)
133 Miles - Longest Daily Distance (Selkirk PP, Ontario to Pinery PP, Ontario, 5/3/2006)
476 Ounces - Peanut Butter Consumed (By Weight)(Add three kilograms.  I don't know how many ounces
                that is, but it's a lot.)
14.75 Miles - Longest Coast "No Pedaling" (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
43 MPH - Top Speed (Near Gladstone PP, BC)
4 - Times Across The Continental Divide
5 - Time Zone Changes
12 - Tunnels
1 Mile - Longest Tunnel
500 Yards - Longest Tunnel I Didn't Hitch A Ride Through
0 - Encounters With Jerks
 
Things Broke or Wore Out...
 
12 - Flats(Including one double flat in Salt Lake City, UT)
1 - Front Derailleur(I left home with an antique derailleur on my bike. Good one.)
1 - Tent Pole(Long)(Snapped about a week out)
1 - Batting Gloves
3 - Rear Spoke
1 - Rear Rim
1 - Chain
3 - Rear Tire
1 - Bike Shorts
1 - Cycling Socks
1 - Lighter(Bic)
1 - Derailleur Cable(Rear)
1 - Ballpoint Pen
4,600 Miles - Rear Hub Serviced(Jackson, WY)
 
I intended to make a list of strange things that I saw on the side of the road, but much to my shame and surprise, I did not see many strange things, or much trash of any kind on the side of the road once I left The South.  Booo!
 
I will have the reading list out sometime in the next week.
 
Peace!

Sunday, September 17, 2006

Greetings From Utah - Part II

I am camped tonight in Zion National Park. No one tell the IDF that Zion is in Utah. They'll start dropping cluster bombs on Salt Lake City and herd all of the surviving Mormons into refugee camps on the salt flats. The next thing you know, there will be settlements all the way to El Paso and the United States government will label Texas a terrorist state.

Kidding aside, Zion is the most amazing place I have ever seen in my life. I am glad it is the last stop on my trip instead of the first. The last six months would have been filled with expectation and disappointment. As it is, I seem to have saved the best for last. Tomorrow I am going to ride a quick fifty miles to St. George, UT, rent a car, and come home.

The peoole of Utah have become more normal and friendly as I have moved away from their urban areas. I haven't seen that far out, half-crazed look for a week now. I am assuming that that was the look of religious zealotry, and I guess it's to be expected at the epicenter of one of the world's fastest growing religions. I imagine that you would see the same look in the eyes of the citizens of Mecca, or of those lurking around The Vatican. It's probably not uncommon around Greenway Plaza these days, now that I think about it.

I saw Devil's Kitchen this week, finishing off the trifecta that started with Devil's Tower and Hell's Canyon. In all my travels, I never saw any heavenly-themed attractions. When I was visiting Devil's Tower, I did have the good fortune to hear a man tell a park ranger that he was offended by the name "Devil's Tower", and then asked what it would take to change the name to "God's Tower". The ranger was truly lucky that day, because he got to answer honestly, and with a straight face, that to change the name of a national monument would take...an act of congress.

I wish I could sum up everything I have seen, and felt, and learned on this trip, and present it, for your enjoyment and digestion, in a few simple sentences. I can't. I can say that I am looking forward to challenges, which I have avoided for twenty years, and trying, which I have failed to do for at least as long, and reaching goals, which I have never before even set. My thoughts on society, politics, and philosophy have been myriad and constant since I have been on the road. I have tried not to share to many of these thoughts here because they require a dialogue, not a pulpit, just like any thoughts that concern people. I look forward to a dialogue with each and every one of you. It has been too long.

Two more things bear mentioning here. First, I have found the American people, in general, to be woefully ignorant about many things, and that they harbor factual misconceptions about things that directly effect their lives. Second, the American people are kind, friendly, peaceful, and generous. At least everyone that I met in six months and over 8,000 miles was.

Expect a couple more updates. One will include a final tally of vital statistics. One will include a trip reading list, with reviews, per request.

Don't take any wooden nickels.

Peace!
Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.

Monday, September 11, 2006

Greetings From Utah!

I write this afternoon from Uinta National Forest. I'm not sure how to pronounce Uinta, I have only read the name on maps, and now on signs. I have finally reacged the wilderness after traversing the endless urban sprawl that is the Salt Lake City metroplex.

I rolled out of the desert and into Brigham City on Thursday. At 2:00 in the afternoon, they were clearing the streets and people were setting up chairs by the roadside in anticipation of the Peach Days parade. I would have loitered to see what all of the fuss was about, but I figured I would only be disappointed after having witnessed the spectacle of Mule Day some months ago.

I proceeded to Willard Bay State Park, picked a site by the water, and scooped up a handful of murky liquid for a taste test. The water was nasty, but it was not salty. I knew The Great Salt Lake was a hoax. A few minutes later I read the park brochure and discovered that Willard Bay is a freshwater reservoir dammed off from the main body of the lake. Not to be foiled so easily, I woke Friday morning and headed to Antelope Island, which is surrounded by the lake on all sides.

The Great Salt Lake is not easy to reach by bicycle. You have to cross 100 miles of desert, take the interstate, travel many hours through urban and industrial areas, or some combination of the above. After being misdirected three times and crossing a ten mile causeway, I reached the island. The Great Salt lake is smelly, gross, and indeed very salty. Yes, there are antelope on the island. I saw four.

Yesterday I rode back across the causeway and then 65 miles from the north end of Salt Lake City to the south. I saw the state capitol and stopped at Temple Square to inspect the tabernacle. They have clean, spacious restrooms. All day long, from one end of the city to the other was like rush hour. Imagine riding a bicycle down Westheimer from Highway 6 to downtown and then back with five o'clock traffic the entire time and you'll have an idea of what my Saturday was like...plus three flats.

This morning I rode through Orem and Provo and then finally reached a rural area again after three days and 150 or so miles. This morning's ride was great, though. The streets and highways were completely deserted and most everything but gas stations was closed. I realized why yesterday was so crazy. Mormons respect the Sabbath.

And speaking of Mormons, I have never seen so many churches in my life. I probably passed 1,000 in the past three days, no fooling. I was able to spot five withib one block at one intersection. And every one I saw was Mormon except for one. It was a Lutheran church in a fairly new 3,000 square foot brick building.

I can tell that school is back in session. People are still enjoying the beautiful weather on the weekends, but I have the campgrounds pretty much to myself during the week.

My reading has slowed to a crawl in the past week for a couple of reasons. The days are getting noticeably shorter. A few weeks ago I was waking up with the sun at five. Now I am waking up with the sun around seven. This usually puts me into camp around mid-afternoon rather than early afternoon. Alsp, my mileage estimates since I hit Idaho have been way off, almost every day, sometimes by as much as 60%. I don't know what I was thinking when I made these estimates. Today, for instance, I am camped at ab altitude of nearly 8,000 feet, the third highest elevation of my trip, and this morning I didn't even know that there would be a hill. Luckily, I am pretty much a cyborg by this point, so I'm not overtaxed physically. I'm just spending a lot more time in the saddle than anticipated.

Many people I have spoken with in Utah have a funny look in their eye. They seem to be looking at you, but their eyes are focused at a point way beyond your head, possibly beyond the atmosphere. It's as if it is hard for them to hold a conversation because they are too busy listening to the voices in their head.

Peace!
Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Greetings From Idaho - Part III

Happy Labor Day! I write tonight from the barren and unearthly landscape of Craters of the Moon National Monument. Who knew that there were volcanos in Idaho? I am continuing to enjoy my time here. The scenery is constantly changing and always gorgeous. The Payette River is probably the most beautiful and violent river I have seen in my life. I saw a group of mule deer yesterday evening that could only be described as a herd.

Jamie and her mother flew into Boise this weekend and picked me up in Stanley to spend a couple of days with some family of their's in Challis. I came away overfed and overrelaxed. I must say I have never felt so welcome or so comfortable in the home of complete strangers. Thank you.

Just so you don't get the impression that Idaho is perfect, I have been trying to find fault with this state for the past week. I have come to a conclusion. Idaho state parks are stingy with their electricity. To date, I have stayed at plenty of campgrounds out in the woods with no electricity anywhere. They are remote, peaceful, and beautiful, and this is accepted and appreciated. But, for the first five months of this trip, I found that if there were power lines running into a campground, that icould find an outlet to charge my phone, camera, or iPod. This is usually as easy as walking into the bathroom and looking above the sink, though sometimes it requires walking around the outer perimeter of the building, or even scouring the grounds for a maintainence shed. Not so in Idaho. The bathrooms have electric lights, but not an outlet to be found anywhere. I've searched every state park I have visited here high and low and have yet to find an unguarded outlet. As that ia the worst I can say of this place, I suggest you come visit as soon as possible.

While on the subject, you can locate an open outlet along the front wall of any grocery store, anywhere, no matter how large or small. I don't know why, but thankfully, they are there.

I would now like to speak about the typos, misspellings, and grammatical errors with which these updates are rife. I belong to the rectal school of thought regarding excuses. That is, everyone has them, and they all stink. Yet, here is mine. I type these dispatches with a 1.5" screen and a 1.5" keyboard, often in poor light. I work without the benefit of a dictionary, or a spell checker. Though I feel like I proofread my words before I broadcast them, I often go back later to find ridiculous and glaring errors. Thia causes me no small amount of embarrassment, being the type who at home will spend fifteen minutes writing and rewriting a three sentence email. I see myself as striving for perfection. Jamie says I am being ridiculous, and that everyone understands my circumstances and the resulting imperfections in my output. She is probably right. I just want to state for the record that I take spelling, usage, and punctuation very seriously. That's how I was taught.

Tomorrow I get to see a nuclear reactor. I should see Utah by the end of the week.

Peace!
Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.